Posts tagged with "commercial"

Apple Airs New iPhone 6 Commercials – “Huge” and “Cameras”

Apple aired two new iPhone commercials last night, showcasing the new size of the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus as well the improved cameras on both devices.

Narrated by Jimmy Fallon and Justin Timberlake, the ads are called "Huge" and "Cameras". In the first ad, Fallon tries to explain the additions to the new iPhones with Timberlake simply remarking that they're "huge". In the second ad, they go into more detail about new features such as time-lapse mode, Slo-Mo at 240 fps, and image stabilization, showing various parts of iOS 8's UI from the Camera and Photos apps.

Apple announced yesterday that 10 million iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus units were sold over the opening weekend, a new record for the company. You can watch both ads below.

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Apple Debuts New ‘Your Verse’ iPad Adverts

Earlier today Apple posted two more iPad ads as part of their ongoing 'Your Verse' series. These latest two ads feature Detroit community activist Jason Hall and the Beijing-based electropop musicians of Yaoband. The 'Your Verse' series of ads tell stories about how different people use their iPad in their own unique ways, not only through a 30-second ad, but also through dedicated webpages that tell their stories in more detail.

Part of the 'Your Verse' webpages are dedicated to highlighting the apps used frequently by those featured in the ad. For Jason Hall that includes Prezi, Penultimate and Phoster.

It began simply enough. Just 10 friends on a Monday night ride. Soon it was 20. Then 30. In its second year, the ride grew from 130 to 300 cyclists in two weeks. As the numbers increased, Hall turned to his iPad and made it the command center for all things Slow Roll. “We use it for everything we do, from mapping to communicating to ordering new T-shirts,” he says.

For Yaoband they use iMaschine to capture various sounds that they use in their performances, whilst also using iMusic Studio and iMPC.

Inspired by the pulse of life in modern China, they started by capturing audio samples with iPad and turning them into progressive beats. Nothing was sacred as they flowed in and out of musical genres, mixing electronica with rock, rap, and traditional Chinese songs. “We were just like scientists in a lab, trying many formulas,” says Peter. “Every single song was a surprise, because it was always better than I imagined.”

You can view the full ads below, or view them on the 'Your Verse' pages for Yaoband and Jason Hall.

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Apple Airs New “Parenthood” iPhone 5s Commercial

Apple aired a new iPhone 5s commercial today, focusing on parents using iPhone apps and compatible hardware devices in their everyday lives. The ad is called "Parenthood", and it aired on the seventh anniversary of the iPhone's launch in the United States on June 30, 2007.

The new commercial follows the company's theme of "You're more powerful than you think", highlighting the capabilities of the iPhone 5s and its rich ecosystem of connected apps and accessories. While the first ad in the series put the spotlight on health and fitness-related activities, Parenthood depicts common scenarios of parenting life from early morning with a Withings baby monitor and the MyTeeth app to late evening, when the iPhone's flashlight is used to find a misplaced toy before a little girl goes to bed.

Throughout the video, Apple highlights an array of devices such as WeMo, a Tractive dog collar, a Kinsa smart thermomether, and Parrot's wireless sensor for plants. The iPhone is shown both as a portable computer to record the life and moments of a family as well as a device with apps that bring family members closer together or teach young kids to brush their teeth or draw. As Matthew Panzarino notes, the iPhone isn't a passive experience or a surrogate for a parent. Apple suggests that empowerment from apps and accessories is subtle but powerful, naturally integrated in a modern lifestyle with an interplay of hardware and software. And like its previous Strength commercial, the iPhone's portability isn't a demanding burden -- whether it's trying to exercise while pushing a stroller or snapping macro photos of shellfish with an attached lens, the iPhone's form factor allows the device to be a constant enjoyable addition to our daily lives.

At WWDC, Apple introduced HomeKit, a new set of APIs for developers of hardware accessories with dedicated apps to plug into for better integration with iOS and standardization. With Strength and Pareenthood, Apple isn't just promoting the iPhone as a phone: they're advertising a platform of experiences revolving around the iPhone, which, as the campaign implies, is a powerful message, narrated through familiar and relatable stories.

You can watch Apple's new Parenthood ad below.

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Apple Debuts Two New ‘Your Verse’ iPad Adverts

Apple last night posted two new iPad adverts as part of their ongoing 'Your Verse' series. The two adverts feature travel writer Chérie King and composer/conductor Esa-Pekka Salonen. Like Apple's previous 'Your Verse' adverts, they tell a story about how people use the iPad in different ways.

My iPad lets me share my journey with the world. Other deaf people tell me they're traveling more now because they see it's possible. (Chérie King)

In the advert with Esa-Pekka Salonen, Apple features the apps The Orchestra, Pianist Pro and Notion. Apple has also made available a live performance from Salonen free on iTunes (if you are in the US).

Meanwhile, WordPress, BabelDeck, AroundMe and Fotopedia are just some of the iPad apps featured in the advert with Chérie King.

iPad is the best tool I've seen to write down the first impulse. Those moments when your mind is open, free. And then you think, what if? (Esa-Pekka Salonen)

You can view the full adverts below or on Apple's website, where you can also read the full 'Your Verse' stories from Chérie King and Esa-Pekka Salonen.

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Apple Posts New Ad Shot Entirely on iPhones, Edited on Macs

To further commemorate the 30th anniversary of the introduction of the original Macintosh on January 24, 1984, Apple has published a new ad shot entirely with iPhones on a single day in 15 different locations around the world. The creative production of the ad was overseen by Jake Scott, son of Ridley Scott, who directed the iconic 1984 commercial. On January 24, 2014, iPhone-equipped crews sent by Apple to 15 separate locations started uploading raw footage to a server in the United States, where Angus Wall and a team of 21 editors could edit using Macs.

Apple's new commercial doesn't only focus on Macs -- while they're prominently displayed, Apple highlights how the impact of the Mac has changed the computer industry, leading to the creation of the iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. All Apple products are shown in the ad: there's a father making breakfast for his son using an app to control his prosthetic hands; a conductor analyzing musicians' performance with a Mac; kids using iPads at school, and more.

From sunrise in Melbourne to nightfall in Los Angeles, they documented people doing amazing things with Apple products. They shot over 70 hours of footage — all with the iPhone 5s. Then it was edited and scored with an original soundtrack. Thanks to the power of the Mac and the innovations it has inspired, an effort that normally takes months was accomplished in a matter of days.

In one day, Apple received footage for 45 stories from 15 locations spanning multiple timezones, which required 36 hours of productions in Los Angeles; Apple used 100 iPhones to shoot over 70 hours of footage. As Apple notes, "initially, the team of cinematographers thought they would need lots of professional equipment and software", but in the end only iPhones with "additional equipment" were used.

Even more impressively, Apple notes that Jake Scott and his team transformed a sound stage in Los Angeles to oversee production remotely using Macs, iPads, and external displays. Scott could direct cinematographers remotely with FaceTime (as shown by Apple, a second iPhone followed each shooting session for real-time feedback) and have an instant overview of footage coming from around the world.

In order to direct 15 separate locations filming in a single day, Jake Scott transformed a sound stage in Los Angeles into a command center. He equipped it with an arsenal of Apple products including iMac, Mac Pro, and iPad, along with large projection displays positioned around the room. From there he was able to watch every scene as it was shot, and direct all the action remotely via FaceTime. Many involved in the production believe this innovative approach to a multilocation shoot will be adopted by other filmmakers.

Today's commercial is the culmination of Apple's efforts to communicate the importance of the Mac and the stories of people who use Apple devices. Today's message, unlike the dedicated Mac webpage, isn't about the Macintosh per se, but the ecosystem of Apple products that it helped creating.

You can watch the commercial below. Read more


Apple Airs New “Your Verse” iPad Air Commercial

Your Verse

Your Verse

Apple has today aired a new iPad Air commercial called “Your Verse Anthem” focused on the capabilities of the iPad as a device to express the creativity of the human race. The ad features voiceover by Robin Williams taken from the movie Dead Poets Society; in the clip that Apple chose, John Keating (Robin Williams) describes why people read and write poetry and how everyone can contribute a verse to the world. Interestingly, as noted by Linus Edwards, this isn’t the first time Apple has been inspired by Dead Poets Society. Read more


Ken Segall On Apple’s Christmas Ad

Ken Segall:

Most of these people mistake their personal opinion, instinct, values and/or taste for actual marketing talent. There are tens of millions of people who will stop in their tracks at this commercial and wipe a tear from their eye. As a result, they will feel slightly more attached to Apple, which is the marketing purpose of this spot.

Far from depressing, this ad is wonderfully optimistic. In the most human terms, it says that the right technology can bring people closer together. It’s a perfect thought for the holidays.

There will always be people who like to compare speeds and feeds and enjoy a commercial focused on tech specs, but Apple is going in a different direction with this ad.

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Apple Airs iPhone 5s Holiday Commercial Featuring AirPlay

Just in time for the holidays, Apple today aired and published a new iPhone 5s commercial focused on AirPlay and the impact that capturing memories can have on real life scenarios. The commercial, called "Misunderstood", was first spotted by 9to5mac and subsequently posted by Apple on their official website and YouTube channel.

The commercial is interesting for a variety of reasons. The underlying theme is fairly straightforward: there's a family gathering for Christmas, with parents, grandparents, kids, and other relatives getting together to celebrate the holiday. It's snowing and kids are playing outside, running, building a snowman, and taking walks with their parents. Inside, adults are making preparations, cooking, talking by the Christmas tree -- perhaps they're seeing each other after months of work and normal life routine that prevents them from being always together, all the time. It's a typical Christmas family reunion.

There's a teenager with a 5s who in the first half of the commercial is shown constantly checking his iPhone: he's holding the iPhone as he greets his relatives, he's absorbed in the display and apps while everybody else is seemingly having a good time, and, again, he goes back to his iPhone while others are looking at the festive tree inside the house. At one point, his grandfather throws a hat towards his iPhone's camera to grab his attention -- "Put that thing down and come join us!", the commercial seems to say. We've all seen (or been) this kid in our lives, full of electronic devices.

And then the commercial changes: as the entire family is gathered in the living room, the boy walks in, his iPhone in hand, and turns on an Apple TV connected to the television. He connects the iPhone to the Apple TV wirelessly with AirPlay, and he starts streaming a video. This is where Apple reveals the story behind the ad: the kid wasn't just isolating himself from his family because he was bored and he needed his apps -- he was making a home video for his family. The perspective changes: what, from the outside, looked like a teenager ignoring family members reveals photos and videos taken with the iPhone's camera and (likely) edited with iMovie. There are touching clips of kids playing, people hugging, laughing, kissing, and just having the good time that everybody wants to have for Christmas -- when life routine is far away in the city and you get to wake up late and take a walk with your kid in the snow. Heads turn in the living room -- "How did you make this?", you can almost hear people ask.

The iPhone shown in the first half of the commercial wasn't being used as an escape device to kill boredom -- it's advertised as a creation device used to create memories, edit videos, and share a touching moment with family members that you don't see much often anymore. From the iPhone's camera point of view, now mirrored via AirPlay onto the big screen for others to see, everything makes more sense: seeing relatives and watching them talk, play, and share personal moments. The iPhone was used to record life rather than escape from it. The home video ends, notably, with a selfie; people are happy, the kid is happy. Cut to family house seen from outside. Happy holidays from Apple.

Apple's new commercial may be deemed as unrealistic by some (an Apple TV at your grandparents' house? Teens not using Snapchat?), but it's good. It's relatable, human, and it highlights the iPhone's best features (the 5s' camera, SloMo, powerful video editing, streaming, music) with the personal touch that Apple has been employing in the past years for commercials such as Photos, Music, and FaceTime Every Day. It's a clever commercial in that it sells a product while telling a story that people know -- but from the angle of technology empowering us in new ways.

The inclusion of the Apple TV and AirPlay is interesting. AirPlay, in its various forms, has long been considered one of Apple's most undervalued features, and the company is trying to position it as an easy to use and useful companion to the main iPhone experience. There are no screens showing how AirPlay is activated or the Apple TV interface, but the message is there: there's a way to show iPhone videos on the television. It'll be interesting to see if Apple will follow-up to this in future commercials.

As Christmas approaches, Apple is once again advertising the iPhone as an experience more than a gadget. It's not about the camera sensor, the faster processor, the apps, or wireless streaming taken individually -- it's about how all these elements, together, make technology (in this case, Apple's technology) fit into our lives, empowering us.

You can watch the commercial below.