Federico Viticci

9249 posts on MacStories since April 2009

Federico is the founder and Editor-in-Chief of MacStories, where he writes about Apple with a focus on apps, developers, iPad, and iOS productivity. He founded MacStories in April 2009 and has been writing about Apple since. Federico is also the co-host of AppStories, a weekly podcast exploring the world of apps, and Dialog, a show where creativity meets technology.

He can also be found on his three other podcasts on Relay FM – Connected, Adapt, and Remaster.

| Instagram: @viticci |

This week's sponsor

Tumult Hype Professional

Create stunning web animations without the code


Connected, Episode 247: You Never Want the Egg

With the dust settling from WWDC, the boys go through Apple’s major platforms and talk about what they are excited about seeing in these releases.

On last week's episode of Connected, we went over our favorite announcements from WWDC. You can listen below (and find the show notes here).

0:00 01:48:19

Connected, Episode 247

Sponsored by:

  • Hover: Get 10% off any domain name - extensions for anything you’re passionate about.
  • Luna Display: The only hardware solution that turns your iPad into a wireless display for your Mac. Use promo code CONNECTED at checkout for 10% off.
  • Freshbooks: Online invoicing made easy.
  • Squarespace: Make your next move. Enter offer code CONNECTED at checkout to get 10% off your first purchase.
Permalink

Adapt, Episode 3: iPadOS First Look and Voice-Only Computing

Before diving into the newly announced iPadOS 13 and its Files improvements, Ryan shares how he cheated on his challenge using a powerful new iPadOS feature.

In this week's episode of Adapt, Ryan explains how he tackled my dictation challenge and we start discussing the changes in iPadOS. You can listen below (and find the show notes here), and don't forget to send us questions using #AskAdapt and by tagging our Twitter account.

0:00 01:05:08

Adapt, Episode 3

We've got a lot of ground to cover with iPadOS and the new Shortcuts app on Adapt this summer, and it's going to be a fun ride. Make sure to subscribe to the show using one of the links below so you'll never miss an episode when it drops.

Permalink

Initial Thoughts on iPadOS: A New Path Forward

When I published my Beyond the Tablet story a few weeks ago, I was optimistic we'd get a handful of iPad-related features and optimizations at WWDC. I did not, however, foresee an entire OS designed specifically around iPad. And the more I think about it, the more I see iPadOS as a sign of Apple's willingness to break free from old assumptions and let the iPad be what it's best at: a portable computer inspired by the Mac, but based on iOS.

Read more


Connected, Episode 246: The Ultimate Dark Mode Is a Crash

Live from WWDC in San Jose, Federico, Myke and Stephen review their WWDC predications and prizes are awarded after an intervention. Then, iPadOS, Shortcuts and the Mac Pro are discussed before Federico's surprise is unveiled for the world to see.

Live from San Jose, our extra-special live episode, featuring my long-awaited surprise. You can listen below (and find the show notes here).

Sponsored by:

  • Astropad Studio: Turn your iPad into a professional graphics tablet.
  • MacStadium: Get two months for the price of one on a Mac mini subscription.
  • Instabug: The Most Comprehensive Feedback Platform for Mobile Apps
Permalink

Dialog Season 1, Episode 2: A Conversation with John Gruber

Today, we published the second episode of Dialog Season 1 (called 'Writers and Writing') featuring the first part of a conversation with Daring Fireball's John Gruber.

You can find the episode here or listen through the Dialog web player below.

I'd like to provide some context around this interview as John Gruber was one of the first names I thought of when my colleague John pitched the original idea for Dialog months ago.

When I started MacStories 10 years ago, Daring Fireball was one of my main sources of inspiration: I was incredibly fascinated by the idea that a single person – more than a blogger, a writer – could share his opinions about Apple and technology on a website that was so clearly attached to his name. Gruber's columns and original in-depth software reviews were the blueprints upon which I modeled my writing for MacStories: at the time, I felt that, even though English was not my primary language, I could at least try to do the same, but for iPhone apps and the modern age of the App Store and iOS developers.

Of course, as I shared for our tenth anniversary coverage in April, MacStories' style and scope changed throughout the years: I realized I didn't want to run a single-person website anymore and we expanded to newsletters and, most recently, podcast production. However, two of the underlying principles that I observed in Daring Fireball a decade ago still inspire my work and MacStories to this day: MacStories is a website by Federico Viticci and Friends (it's right there in the logo), and I want to publish longform, personal opinion columns in addition to news, app reviews, and links.

John Gruber and Daring Fireball created a framework for other independent online writers to follow in the late 2000s, particularly in the Apple community. From this very website to 512 Pixels or Six Colors, I genuinely believe we owe a lot to John Gruber's experiments with online ads, sponsors, memberships, and merch – ideas that, in many ways, he pioneered over 15 years ago when it was uncommon and, to an extent, perhaps even frowned upon – to try and monetize an "indie site" on the open web.

In this week's episode of Dialog, we asked John to tell the story of his first experiences as a writer (and later editor-in-chief) of the school newspaper at Drexel, where he majored in computer science. That intersection of programming and in-depth, opinionated writing ended up shaping John's entire career as a freelancer, documentation writer at Bare Bones Software, and, finally, independent writer at Daring Fireball. In addition to contextualizing John's experiences as a newspaper columnist and editor in the early 90s, in the interview we covered topics such as the role of luck and privilege, how Daring Fireball's beginnings can be traced back to Apple's renaissance with the iPod, and, of course, the business of writing online and how he sees the influence of Daring Fireball over the indie Apple community.

I'm happy we were able to interview John for this first season of Dialog, and I like how the entire conversation turned out. It's inspiring to hear the backstory of Daring Fireball and the core ideas at the foundation of one of the most successful indie websites on the Internet. In Part 2 of this interview, out next week, we'll continue to dig deeper into the business of Daring Fireball, how John makes a distinction between linked posts and regular columns, his podcast The Talk Show, and, of course Markdown.

If you haven't subscribed to Dialog yet, now's a good time to do so. You can listen to the first part of our interview with John Gruber here, and subscribe to Dialog so you'll instantly receive Part 2 when it drops next week.


Adapt, Episode 2: iOS 13 Wishes, HomeKit Experiments, and Writing in Apple Notes

Ryan tries new HomeKit options on his iPad, Federico writes and publishes an article from Notes, then the guys share their top two iOS 13 wishes for iPad.

In the second episode of Adapt, Ryan explains how he tackled my HomeKit challenge, I go over my approach for writing a MacStories post in the Notes app, and we share our top wishes for iOS 13 on iPad. We also answer some listener questions.

You can listen below (and find the show notes here), and don't forget to send us questions using #AskAdapt and by tagging our Twitter account.

0:00 01:06:11

Adapt, Episode 2

Permalink

Connected, Episode 245: Totes Ricky

With less than a week to the WWDC keynote, the guys make their predictions.

On this week's episode of Connected and ahead of our live show in San Jose next week (we have a handful of tickets left), we share our final WWDC predictions. The results will be adjudicated live at the Hammer Theater next week. You can listen below (and find the show notes here).

0:00 01:29:35

Connected, Episode 245

Sponsored by:

  • ButcherBox: Thoughtfully sourced meat delivered directly to your door
  • KiwiCo: Change the way your kid plays, with KiwiCo! Get your first crate free!
  • Hullo: A simple, natural pillow designed for comfort. Try it for 60 days.
Permalink

Connected, Episode 244: This Is Not Propaganda

Myke keeps dropping his phone, Apple keeps releasing new MacBook Pros for Stephen to talk about, and Federico has published a magnum opus on the state of the iPad and iOS 12.

On last week's episode of Connected, we discussed the updated MacBook Pros, the themes behind my iPad story, and more. You can listen below (and find the show notes here).

0:00 01:25:05

Connected, Episode 244

Sponsored by:

Permalink

(Don’t Fear) The Reaper

Apple needed to show developers that Carbon was going to be a real and valid way forward, not just a temporary stopgap, so they committed to using Carbon for the Mac OS X Finder. The Carbon version of Finder was introduced in Mac OS X Developer Preview 2, before Aqua was revealed; it acted a bit more like NeXT's, in that it had a single root window (File Viewer) that had a toolbar and the column view, but secondary windows did not. At this stage, Apple didn't quite know what to do with the systemwide toolbars it had inherited from NEXTSTEP.

[...]

It had taken Apple four years to find the new 'Mac-like', and this is the template Mac OS X has followed ever since. Here we are, eighteen years later, and all of the elements of the Mac OS X UI are still recognizable today. So much of what we think of the Mac experience today came from NEXTSTEP, not Mac OS at all. AppKit, toolbars, Services, tooltips, multi-column table views, font & color pickers, the idea of the Dock, application bundles, installer packages, a Home folder, multiple users; you might even be hard-pressed to find a Carbon app in your Applications folder today (and Apple has announced that they won't even run in the next version of macOS).

Fascinating read by Steve Troughton-Smith on how Apple transitioned from NeXTSTEP to Mac OS X between 1997 and 2001. The purpose of this analysis, of course, isn't to simply reminisce about the NeXT acquisition but to provide historical context around the meaning of "Mac-like" by remembering what Apple did when the concept of "Mac-like" had to be (re)created from scratch.

Apple is going to be facing a similar transition soon with the launch of UIKit on the Mac; unlike others, I do not believe it means a complete repudiation of whatever "Mac-like" stands for today. The way I see it, it means the idea of "Mac-like" will gradually evolve until it reaches a state that feels comfortable and obvious. I'm excited to see the first steps of this new phase in a couple of weeks.

Permalink