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Connected, Episode 231: Dozens of Invisible Footnotes

The boys dive into a sea of rumors after Federico explores San Jose's municipal websites, Myke gives everyone a gift and Stephen returns from a journey.

On this week's episode of Connected, we discuss the latest Marzipan rumors and consider the implications of a 6K display made by Apple. You can listen here.

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Apple Answers Two-Factor Authentication Questions Raised by Developers

A week ago, Apple sent an email to developers announcing that it would require two-factor authentication for all developer accounts beginning February 27, 2019. The message linked to an Apple two-factor authentication support page that applies to all Apple IDs. The trouble was, the support page didn’t answer many of the developer-specific questions that were immediately raised.

The concern I’ve heard voiced most often by developers is whether someone who uses one Apple ID to log into their developer account would be able to do so using an Apple device that is logged in using a different Apple ID. Today, Apple published a new support page answering this and many other questions. Specifically with respect to the two-Apple ID scenario, Apple’s FAQ-style support page says:

Will I need a trusted device dedicated to my Apple Developer account if I enable two-factor authentication?

No. You’ll need to use a trusted device to enable two-factor authentication for the first time. However, you can use the same trusted device for multiple Apple IDs that are enabled for two-factor authentication. Additionally, if you do not have access to your trusted device, you can get your verification code via SMS or phone call. When possible, you should use a trusted device to increase security and streamline the process.

The document covers many other situations as well including:

  • How to check if you have two-factor authentication enabled
  • Configuring an iOS device or Mac to accept authentication codes for multiple Apple IDs
  • Enabling multiple trusted phone numbers that can receive authentication codes

The support page concludes with a link to a contact form for Apple’s developer team to raise any other circumstances that prevent a developer from enabling two-factor authentication.

Although it would have been better if this level of detail was published when Apple’s initial email went out to developers last week, the company has clearly heard the concerns raised by the developer community and has put together a thorough explanation that should address most situations. By answering the most common questions, Apple Developer Relations will hopefully be freed up to deal with any outlier issues that aren’t addressed in its support documentation.


Jason Snell on Podcasting with Only an iPad Pro

Jason Snell's podcasting setup is similar to mine – he wants to hear his own voice, record his local audio track, and have a conversation with multiple people on Skype, who also need to hear his voice coming from an external microphone. And he wants to use one computer to do it all. Now he's figured out how to podcast from an iPad Pro with the help of an additional USB interface:

In the past, I’ve done something similar using the Audio-Technica ATR2100-USB, a microphone that can output a digital signal using USB and an analog signal via an XLR cord simultaneously. The problem is that the last time I tried to use the ATR2100-USB with my iPad Pro, it didn’t return my own voice into my ears, making me unable to judge the sound quality of my own microphone. After years of having my own voice return to me, I strongly prefer not to record unable to hear my own voice. (I use in-ear headphones that largely shut out audio from the outside world, so the experience of speaking while not hearing yourself is even more profoundly weird than it would be with leaky earbuds.)

This time I wanted it all, or at least as close to all as I’m able to get with iOS in the mix: A pristine recording of my own voice, that same high-quality microphone audio also flowing across digitally to my podcast guests via Skype, and the ability to hear both my guests and myself at the same time.

The takeaway from the story isn't that Snell wanted to prove a point to spite Mac users – it's that he was able to travel with one computer instead of two (he would have used most of the same audio gear with a Mac too) and that he found an expensive, but real workaround to professional podcast recording on iPad Pro.

I don't currently have a USB audio interface like Snell's USBPre 2, but I may have to buy one before the summer so I can record podcasts from our beach house using only the iPad Pro. (That is, assuming the iOS 13 beta I'll have installed at that point doesn't have meaningful improvements for audio workflows.)

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The HyperDrive Slim 8-in-1 USB-C Hub Balances Flexibility and Portability for Mac and iPad Pro Owners

My main Mac is a 2016 MacBook Pro, which isn’t ideal. The problem isn’t really the laptop itself, it’s that my needs have changed. You see, in 2016 I was commuting to downtown Chicago every day and I wanted a portable Mac for working in Xcode and other tasks on the go.

Now, I work from home and my MacBook Pro sits in clamshell mode most of the time. It’s handy to have the MacBook to take with me when I need it, but that’s far less frequent than it used to be. Instead, my Mac drives a 27” LG 4K display, is connected to Ethernet, speakers, a Luna Display dongle, my podcasting microphone, and various other peripherals I need from time to time.

The trouble with the setup is that I quickly ran out of USB-C ports even though my MacBook Pro has four. I’ve tried several different configurations to streamline my setup, but none were quite right. Now though, I’ve finally found a solution that comes closest to meeting my needs and has the added benefit of working well with my iPad Pro. With a couple of minor caveats, the HyperDrive Slim 8-in-1 USB-C Hub is the best solution I’ve tried.

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Ten Years Ago, Apple Said Goodbye to Macworld but Set the Stage for the Future

Macworld 2009. Image via Engadget

Macworld 2009. Image via Engadget

In January 2009, Apple took to the stage at Macworld Expo one final time. The company announced the change a few weeks before the show. Phil Schiller would deliver the keynote. News of Steve Jobs' medical leave would break just weeks later, one day before the keynote.

All of this cast a weird vibe over the event, and while it was far from Apple's most exciting keynote, it's worth revisiting Phil Schiller's three announcements now, ten years later.1

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AnyFont: Install Any Font on Your iPhone or iPad [Sponsor]

iOS devices come with a pre-installed set of fonts. That’s great, but sometimes you want more. Whether you’re working on a special presentation or another document, AnyFont makes it possible to use exactly the fonts you want whether they come preinstalled or not.

AnyFont lets you install TrueType Fonts (.ttf), OpenType Fonts (.otf) and TrueType Collections (.ttc) on your iPhone, iPod touch or iPad. Once installed, these fonts can be used system-wide in apps like Pages, Keynote, Word, PowerPoint, Cricut Design, and many others. That’s because fonts added with AnyFont are installed as configuration profiles directly in the iOS Settings app.



If you’ve ever started a presentation on your Mac or PC and then opened it on an iOS device to show off only to find your carefully picked fonts replaced with a different default ones, you’ll understand why AnyFont is so powerful. By installing the fonts you use on your desktop on your mobile devices with AnyFont you can confidently show off your presentations on iOS knowing that they’ll look exactly the way you intended. This makes AnyFont the perfect solution for any creative user.

AnyFont is extremely easy to use and comes with an extensive FAQ and an introductory tutorial that walks you through the simple steps for installing a font. AnyFont also features:

  • The ability to add new single fonts or multiple fonts as a ZIP file using iTunes file sharing or the ‘Open in…’ feature from apps like Mail, Files, or Dropbox
  • Font previews
  • An optional bundle of 1,000+ fonts as an In-App Purchase for $ 0.99
  • A complete list of installed and available fonts on your device
  • 3D Touch
  • Localizations in English, French, German, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish

Don’t limit yourself to the fonts that come with iOS, visit AnyFont’s website to learn more, and download the app today to install any font at all on your iPhone or iPad.

Our thanks to AnyFont for sponsoring MacStories this week.


Connected, Episode 230: Here’s the Thing about Code Names

Stephen solves a problem that has been plaguing the podcast, Federico has concerns about Apple's rumored news service and Myke is fighting a losing battle with AirPlay 2.

On this week's episode of Connected, I reveal something from my youth and we consider the potential of future Apple services. You can listen here.

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