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Apple Reports First Year-Over-Year Earnings Drop Since 2019

The past quarter has not been kind to Apple. Today the company announced its first revenue drop since 2019, with total revenue of $117.2 billion, a 5% year-over-year drop. Going into today’s earnings call, the consensus of Wall Street analysts was that Apple would log $121.19 billion of revenue or $1.94/share.

Tim Cook, Apple’s CEO, had this to say about the company’s earnings:

As we all continue to navigate a challenging environment, we are proud to have our best lineup of products and services ever, and as always, we remain focused on the long term and are leading with our values in everything we do. During the December quarter, we achieved a major milestone and are excited to report that we now have more than 2 billion active devices as part of our growing installed base.

The year-over-year decline was driven by multiple factors, including:

  • Shortages of iPhone 14 Pro and Pro Max caused by COVID lockdowns in China
  • Soft consumer demand resulting from worldwide inflationary pressure
  • Adverse effects caused by foreign currency exchange rates

Although Apple did not forecast results for Q1 2023 during its last earnings call, the company warned in November that production disruptions would impact shipments, so the declines today should not be a shock.

Despite Apple’s unusually poor showing today, it’s also important to put it in perspective. The entire technology sector has seen significant declines, with Microsoft, Meta, Google, and Amazon all laying off thousands of workers. To date, Apple has avoided widespread layoffs and there were bright points in its earnings, including the continued growth of its services, which increased to a record $20.8 billion.

With the entire tech industry experiencing substantial financial pressures, the question going forward is how quickly can Apple bounce back. Will the company be able to meet iPhone demand, and how will its rumored bet on a mixed-reality headset play out? With turmoil in the markets at large and a major new product in the wings, Apple’s 2023 should be one of the more interesting years in a long time, both for its investors and fans of its products.



The Practicality of Art in Software

I’ve been following with great interest this series of articles by John Gruber (and Matt Birchler’s related story) about the chasm between iOS and Android apps. I have some thoughts since expanding my app knowledge beyond iOS and iPadOS is one of my goals for 2023.

About a month ago, during my holiday break, I purchased a Google Pixel 7 as a way to re-familiarize myself with Android.1 To say that I found the ecosystem worse than I remembered would be an understatement. It’s not just about the fact that – as Gruber and Birchler noted – most Android apps suck compared to their iOS counterparts; it’s that the entire OS lacks cohesiveness.

Read more


AppStories, Episode 314 – Mastodon Clients for iOS and iPadOS

This week on AppStories, we cover the iPhone and iPad Mastodon apps we’ve been testing and share what we like and don’t about each.

Sponsored by:

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On AppStories+, I share my latest experiments with HomeKit lighting and the Loupedeck Live S.

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To learn more about the benefits included with an AppStories+ subscription, visit our Plans page, or read the AppStories+ FAQ.

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Social Media Management Utility Buffer Adds Mastodon Support

One of the things I immediately missed when I moved to Mastodon was the ability to schedule posts. This isn’t something I do a lot. However, with a busy editorial calendar at MacStories, I’ve used a variety of services over the years, including Buffer, to allow me to set up draft posts in advance when we’ve got a big story or episode of AppStories coming up. Losing that convenience wasn’t the end of the world, but it introduced friction I hadn’t had to deal with in years.

That’s why I’m glad to see Buffer has added Mastodon support to its web and iOS apps today. I’ve been testing Buffer’s beta for the past day, and the best part of the update is that there’s not much to say about it because it’s so easy to use. If you’ve used Buffer before, the process is similar to any other scheduled post you’d create: draft the post, add any media and hashtags you want, and then schedule it. If you want, you can also use Buffer to cross-post to other services.

Scheduling a Mastodon post with Buffer.

Scheduling a Mastodon post with Buffer.

Managing posts for multiple accounts has always been the sort of thing that can disrupt my other work. It’s too easy for me to get distracted and wind up browsing my timeline after I post something from one of our company accounts. With Buffer’s new Mastodon integration, I’m looking forward to creating those posts as part of our production workflow and avoiding getting sucked into my timeline when I have more pressing tasks.


Last Week, on Club MacStories: Things and PDF to JPEG Conversion Shortcuts, MacStories Unplugged, and Apps

Because Club MacStories now encompasses more than just newsletters, we’ve created a guide to the past week’s happenings:

MacStories Weekly: Issue 353


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Our thanks to SaneBox for sponsoring MacStories this week.