Apple Updates FCP X With Multicam Editing, Enhanced XML

With a press release, Apple today announced a major update to its professional video editing tool Final Cut Pro X. The new version, 10.0.3, available as a free update on the Mac App Store, introduces several highly requested features and fixes, including multicam editing, enhanced XML 1.1 support, and advanced chroma keying. A free trial of Final Cut Pro X is available on Apple's website.

Following a controversial launch in June (when the company even made an exception with refunds), Apple responded to negative FCP X feedback promising that more functionalities and improvements would be released in the following months. Today's update brings multicam editing from up to 64 different angles of videos and photos, and XML for advanced interchange with different plugins and applications that support the Final Cut Pro X ecosystem, such as DaVinci Resolve, CatDV (color correction and media management), and the 7toX app from Intelligent Assistance which "uses XML to import Final Cut Pro 7 projects into Final Cut Pro X".

Final Cut Pro X v10.0.3 includes a collection of groundbreaking new tools for editing multicam projects. Final Cut Pro X automatically syncs clips from your shoot using audio waveforms, time and date, or timecode to create a Multicam Clip with up to 64 angles of video, which can include mixed formats, frame sizes and frame rates. The powerful Angle Editor allows you to dive into your Multicam Clip to make precise adjustments, and the Angle Viewer lets you play back multiple angles at the same time and seamlessly cut between them.

Final Cut Pro X builds upon its robust, one-step chroma key with the addition of advanced controls including color sampling, edge adjustment and light wrap. You can tackle complex keying challenges right in Final Cut Pro X, without having to export to a motion graphics application, and view your results instantly with realtime playback.

The Loop has more details on Apple's implementation of multicam editing using audio waveforms:

What’s really different in Apple’s implementation of multicam is how the company does its automatic syncing. Of course, you can sync camera angles by using the timecode or the less accurate method of using the time of day, but Apple has a new way of syncing camera angles — audio waveforms.

Townhill explained that with Final Cut Pro X, you can now sync scenes using the audio waveform captured with the camera. This doesn’t have to be the final audio used in the scene, but it can be used for syncing purposes. Of course, manually syncing cameras is still available at any time.

Furthermore, Apple states in the press release that "broadcast monitoring in Final Cut Pro X is currently in beta and allows you to connect to waveform displays, vectorscopes, and calibrated, high-quality monitors to ensure that your project meets broadcast specifications. Final Cut Pro X supports monitoring of video and audio through Thunderbolt I/O devices, as well as through third party PCIe cards." This update also allows users to import and edit layered Photoshop graphics, and import/export effect parameters through XML 1.1.

At the moment of writing this, the Mac App Store still reports 10.0.2 as the latest FCP X version available. The update should go live later today at this link.