iCloud Detailed: Initially Free with iTunes Purchase, $25 a Year Subscription

The Los Angeles Times details the undisclosed features of iCloud, which has been reported by Apple to be a significant staple in Monday's WWDC keynote. The LA Times reports that iCloud will initially be offered free with a purchase from the iTunes Store, meaning a digital download may fetch you free online storage or perhaps a free subscription, similar to Amazon's current offering where they offer free cloud storage for a year with an album purchase (many took advantage of Lady Gaga's $.99 album for this additional deal). Users will want to build their libraries relatively quickly, and the subscription is said to be available at as little as $25 per year. CNet previously suggested that the service wouldn't be free, but could be around $20 a year. This looks like it'll be a little of both as Apple introduces users to the service.

The LA Times says Apple initially plans to allow consumers to store their data on Apple's servers, and would like to offer much more than music in the realm of movies, television, and and other digital content through iCloud's publishing platform. Whether that storage involves uploading your own media or having iTunes scan your library is currently unknown, but we're hoping for the latter.

The agreements, finalized this week, call for Apple to share 30% of any revenue from iCloud's music service with record labels, as well as 12% with music publishers holding the songwriting rights. Apple is expected to keep the remaining 58%, said people knowledgeable with the terms.

The report comes when Apple's network devices are reported to be ready for an upgrade, perhaps providing some form of iCloud caching for media playback. Apple just sealed the deal with Universal Music Group, and now with iCloud details leaking (as well as iCloud branding), it'll be hard to keep the Lion in its cage over the weekend.

[via Los Angeles Times]