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Search results for "yoink"

Review: Yoink Adds Support for Latest Mojave and iOS 12 Features

Yoink is the app I use on my Mac every day as a temporary spot to park files, snippets of text, images, and URLs. By itself, Yoink for Mac has been a fantastic time-saver. The latest updates to Yoink for iOS and the Mac, however, have been transformative. There's more that can be done to support the cross-platform use of Yoink, but Handoff support, which makes it simple to move data between my Mac and iOS devices, and several other new features have already added a new dimension to the way I use the app and embedded it deeper into my day-to-day workflow than ever before.

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Yoink is the macOS Shelf Utility I Want on iOS Too

At WWDC, I was disappointed that the iOS 11 announcements didn't include a shelf where content can be temporarily parked. When Federico and Sam Beckett made an iOS 11 concept video earlier this year they included a shelf, which felt like a natural way to make touch-based drag and drop simpler. I found the omission in the iOS 11 beta somewhat surprising. On the Mac, people use the Desktop as a temporary place to stash items all the time, and without a Desktop on iOS, a shelf that slides in from the edge of the screen seemed like a natural solution. In fact, it’s a solution that has an even more direct analog than the Desktop on macOS that makes a solid case for implementing something similar on iOS: Yoink, from Eternal Storms Software.

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Better File Juggling with Yoink

When I put together an article for MacStories on my Mac, Yoink by Eternal Storms Software is what brings order to the messy process of creating screenshots. You see, I like to use Spaces on my MacBook Pro to separate my writing environment from other apps I’m using to produce screenshots. But between Spaces, apps, and the Finder, things get cluttered fast. By being available wherever I am on my Mac, Yoink gives me an easily accessible spot to park images as I create them, so that when I’m finished, I can incorporate them into an article all at once, which saves me time.

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Yoink 2.0 Brings Smarter Drag & Drop To Lion

Back in September I reviewed the first version of Yoink, a utility by Eternal Storms Software that greatly enhanced Lion's drag & drop support by adding a virtual "shelf" to the side of your screen to store temporary files you needed to move elsewhere. From my review:

Yoink is a drag & drop assistant for Lion, in that it provides you with a virtual “safe zone” to temporarily store files — or rather, links to them — you want to move from one location (say your desktop) to another space or full-screen app. Yoink doesn’t “copy” a file, or multiple ones, to its shelf: it only acts as a bridge between the original file, and the destination of the drop.

In its first version, Yoink was primarily meant to provide a better way to move files from the Finder to full-screen apps -- that is the reason the app was built with Lion APIs from the ground up. Yoink 1.0 undoubtedly offered a quick and elegant way to move files around apps and desktops in an intuitive manner; Yoink 2.0, released today, is a huge step forward that now allows the app to accept almost any kind of input from OS X, from text to images and web clippings from any app.

In accessing content from apps, Yoink has become more than a simple tool to temporarily store files that need to be moved around full-screen apps -- think of  Yoink 2.0 as a secondary, visual clipboard that can accept almost any kind of file you throw at it. In my tests, besides dropping content from apps into Yoink's shelf, I've copied links, text and images from Safari and Chrome, and successfully watched Yoink create text clippings and full copies of the images ready to be pasted anywhere on my Mac, both in the Finder and other apps. Rich text from a web browser is converted to .textclipping once imported in Yoink, and you can easily re-export everything to the Finder, or into another app that accepts text, such as TextEdit or Twitter's compose window. Want to tweet a famous quote by The Beatles? Drag text into Yoink's shelf, open your client of choice, and drop your previously copied text. How about quoting someone else's words on your blog (and this is something I've been looking forward to)? Drag text into Yoink, fire up your blog's editor window, drop text.

Yoink's new drag & drop system works with almost any app  and any kind of content -- you won't be able to preserve the exact formatting of a rich text document when copying, but it surely works very well as a lightweight solution to quickly save plain text files.

Yoink 2.0 brings a couple more interesting additions besides improved drag & drop. The interface has been redesigned to have more linen and the app can be assigned a keyboard shortcut; more positions for Yoink's window have been added and files shouldn't be lost anymore if they're moved from their original location. One issue I had (and already reported to the developer) was with an alias I moved from Dropbox to my Desktop, which didn't resolve correctly in Yoink and displayed a permission error. The error is likely happening because of some restrictions from Apple's sandboxing technology or the fact that the alias came from Dropbox -- Yoink 2.0 is capable of resolving aliases and, in fact, it worked fine with a file that was originally stored on my Desktop.

Last, Yoink now comes with File Stacks, a neat way to drag and drop multiple files into Yoink's window and have the app combine them into one item in the shelf. This can be very handy if you're dealing with multiple images and PDFs and you want to get them quickly out of the way.

At $2.99 on the Mac App Store, Yoink remains a fantastic way to enhance Lion's drag & drop with an app that acts as a temporary scratchpad/visual clipboard for content that you want to copy, move elsewhere, or simple save for later. Highly recommended, you can get Yoink here.


Yoink: Enhanced Drag & Drop for Lion’s Full-Screen Apps

As I noted in my MacBook Air 13-inch review, the smaller the screen, the better full-screen apps get on Lion. For those still unaware of the new feature, OS X Lion comes with the possibility of enlarging applications to fill the entire screen -- thus the name "full-screen mode" -- so that, similarly to iOS, users can focus on one app at a time. Whereas some full-screen apps can look comically large on bigger displays such as a 21.5-inch iMac or Apple Thunderbolt Display, I found that smaller screens make more sense in regards to full-screen mode in that you don't feel like you're wasting available pixel space. Apple's system applications have already been updated to take advantage of full-screen mode, and we've seen third party developers starting to play around with the new API as well, coming up with interesting solutions to modify the user interface accordingly to full-screen mode.

Personally, I have enjoyed using apps like Evernote, Sparrow and Reeder in full-screen mode on my MacBook Air. With a four-finger swipe, I can easily switch between these apps, and go back to my main desktop where all my other application windows reside. However, as full-screen apps live in their own separate graphical environment, I wished on a couple of occasions that Apple would implement an easier method to move files between spaces and full-screen apps in Lion. Rather than delving into the technical details of drag & drop and APIs, here's a practical example: say I run Sparrow in full-screen mode, and I need to quickly drop an attachment onto a new message window. I could use the app's "attach file" dialog, but drag & drop would be more intuitive. On Lion, there's no simple way to drag files from Desktop 1, and drop them into a full-screen app. In fact, the "easiest" trick I've discovered to achieve such a functionality is to click & hold a file, hit the Mission Control key on my MacBook Air's keyboard, select a a full-screen app and wait for it to "spring load" (e.g. the window flashes and after a few seconds comes in the foreground), then drop the file. Clumsy and slow.

A new app by Eternal Storms -- makers of Flickery and ScreenFloat, among others -- called Yoink, aims at improving Lion's behavior with drag & drop and full-screen apps. Built from the ground-up with Lion-only APIs, Yoink places an unobtrusive, translucent "shelf" at the side of your Mac's screen every time you start dragging a file. Drop the file in there, switch to your full-screen app with a gesture, get the file out of the shelf. Done.

Yoink is a drag & drop assistant for Lion, in that it provides you with a virtual "safe zone" to temporarily store files -- or rather, links to them -- you want to move from one location (say your desktop) to another space or full-screen app.

Yoink doesn't "copy" a file, or multiple ones, to its shelf: it only acts as a bridge between the original file, and the destination of the drop. So, back to my Sparrow example: I can select a bunch of files from my desktop, drop them into Yoink, switch back to Sparrow with a gesture, and get the files out of Yoink. Very simple. This works with any full-screen app, any space -- Yoink works wherever you can drop a file. In fact, nothing stops you from using the app as a drag & drop utility for your Finder windows instead of full-screen apps, although the app is clearly focused on the latter.

In my tests, I've found Yoink to be very lightweight in memory footprint, and easy to use. The app only appears when you start dragging a file -- you won't see its window all the time -- and you can customize it to sit on the left, or right of the screen. Alternatively, you can tell Yoink to quickly move next to your cursor as you drag a file, then go back to screen's side. Yoink can store multiple files, Quick Look them, and let you scroll and select multiple items with CMD-click.

Yoink is available at $2.99 on the App Store, and you can head over the developer's website to check out a demo video and get a better idea of the app in action. If you work with full-screen apps on a daily basis and you'd like to enhance Lion's drag & drop support, Yoink is a must-have.


My Must-Have Mac Apps, 2018 Edition

Last year when I wrote about my must-have Mac apps, I was coming off a tumultuous year that started with a daily commute into Chicago for my old job and ended with me working from home. As the year came to a close, I was exploring what that meant for the way I work on the Mac.

That process continued into 2018. With the number of new things I took on in 2017 and the transition to indie life, I made the conscious decision to step back and settle into my new life. That wasn’t easy. There’s a natural tendency to take on everything that crosses your path when you go out on your own, but I’ve seen too many people fall into that trap in the past. Instead, I concluded that 2018 would be the year to improve the way I already work by refining existing workflows and reevaluating how I get things done, including on the Mac.

Three events led me to work on my Mac more in 2018. The first was the 27-inch LG 4K display I bought in January. It was a big step up from the 23-inch 1080p one I had before and, combined with a VESA arm, improved working at my Mac substantially.

The second factor was our MacStories coverage of the App Store’s tenth anniversary. For it, we produced seven extra episodes of AppStories that were released in the span of one week, which kept me in front of my Mac recording and editing for long periods of late May through June.

Third, just after WWDC, I destroyed the screen of my iPad Pro thanks to the trunk hinges that invade the interior of the 2016 Honda Accord.1 I decided to hold out for the new iPad Pros, but that meant writing for four of the busiest months at MacStories without a good iOS work solution. I used a current-generation 9.7-inch iPad some, but it couldn’t compete with my LG display.

As 2018 comes to a close, the changes I’ve made haven’t been dramatic despite the extra time I’ve spent in front of my Mac. Instead, I’ve fine-tuned existing workflows and added new apps for specific tasks.

Below, I’ve broken down the 49 apps I use roughly by activity and function. I’ll mention where Apple’s apps fit into my workflow as I go because without them there would be a few big holes in the landscape of apps I use, but the focus of this roundup is on third-party apps, not Apple’s.

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  1. I’m right there with you on this one John. ↩︎

My Must-Have iOS Apps, 2018 Edition

Putting together my annual list of Must-Have iOS Apps is an exercise in analyzing the trends of the year and considering which ones had the biggest impact on how I use my iPhone and iPad. Two years ago, it was web services and open APIs; last year, I focused on collaboration with the MacStories team and making my workflow consistent across devices; this year, there isn't a single overarching theme behind this list, but rather a collection of trends and changes that I've observed over the course of 2018.

First and foremost is the switch to a subscription-based business model by some of my favorite apps. As we noted in our look at the modern economics of the App Store earlier this year, it is becoming increasingly challenging for indie developers – the ones who make the apps we tend to use and cover most frequently on MacStories – to find a balance between reaching new customers with paid app updates and supporting an app over the span of multiple years for existing users who already paid once.

A subscription seems like an obvious solution: new customers can try an app for free and later decide to subscribe; longtime users of an app get to support their favorite app over a longer period of time; developers are more incentivized to keep making an app better thanks to the financial security provided by an ongoing revenue stream. Recurring subscriptions for all apps launched two years ago just before WWDC, and it feels like we've only now reached a point where more and more developers are willing to experiment with them. This major shift in app pricing wasn't always met favorably by longtime users of existing apps, which has resulted in developers testing different approaches such as optional subscriptions, bundles containing subscriptions and In-App Purchases, or even multiple ways to unlock the same features. In looking at the apps included in this list, I was surprised by how many now include some form of recurring subscription; I think this transition will only become more prominent in 2019.

The second trend I noticed in my usage of third-party apps is a strong preference for those that fully embrace modern iOS technologies. From Siri shortcuts (by far, the most important iOS developer framework of 2018) to Files integration and support for external keyboards on iPad, I tend to prioritize apps that eschew proprietary functionalities and adopt native APIs such as iCloud, the Files document browser, or Reminders. With iOS growing more powerful and complex each year, I think it's only natural that I've stuck with apps that shy away from Apple-provided solutions as little as possible; those frameworks are always going to be more integrated with the rest of the system than any alternative a developer can come up with, and I seek that level of integration because I enjoy the comfort of an ecosystem where all the pieces work well together.

Lastly, I've noticed some overall changes in the kinds of apps I consider my must-haves for iPhone and iPad. In the "pro" app department, the Photography and Development lists have grown to include apps such as Lightroom, Scriptable, Darkroom, and Halide – all new entries this year. One of my goals with the new iPad Pro is to use it as a workstation for editing photos and programming my own little additions to iOS; I felt like my increased usage of these apps warranted some changes in the annual picks. You will also find more apps designed to interact with macOS as a result of my purchase of a Mac mini (which I'm using as a home server for various tasks) and different utility apps as some of the old ones have been replaced by Shortcuts. An app that, by the way, I can no longer include in this roundup due to my self-imposed rule of not featuring Apple apps because they're kind of obvious choices for an iOS user (this also applies to Shazam, officially acquired by Apple this year).

Below, you'll find a collection of the 60 apps I consider my must-haves on the iPhone and iPad, organized in nine categories; whenever possible, I included links to original reviews and past coverage on MacStories. What you will not find is the usual list of awards for best new app and best app update, which we've relaunched as a team effort under the MacStories Selects name this year. Instead, at the end of the story you'll find my App of the Year, which is also joining MacStories Selects as an award that recognizes an overall outstanding iOS app that had a profound impact on my workflow over the past year, regardless of its release date.

Let's dig in.

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Shortcuts Archive

Since the release of Workflow in 2014, we’ve created hundreds of automations to help readers use their iOS devices more efficiently. The goal of this archive is to offer a complete catalogue of our old workflows as well as new custom shortcuts for Apple’s Shortcuts app.

Each shortcut in this archive has been created and tested by Federico and the MacStories team. Shortcuts are organized in categories, and you can jump directly to a specific category by using one of the section links below.

If you're new to the Shortcuts app, you can find our coverage here; we also recommend going back through the Workflow archives for additional context.

Due to the amount of legacy workflows we are updating for the Shortcuts app, this page is currently a work in progress. Updates will be shared on Twitter via the @viticci and @macstoriesnet accounts.

Total number of shortcuts in archive: 91

Last update: Jan 9, 2019


Jump to section:


App Store

Share iTunes Affiliate Link

Given a link to an item copied from the iTunes Store, this shortcut lets you easily transform it into an affiliate link, which you can share with extensions.

Get the shortcut here.

App Release Notes

Copy the release notes for the latest version of an app shared from the App Store. By default, the shortcut searches the U.S. App Store, but you can change the country to your locale.

Get the shortcut here.

Save App Store Icon

Search the App Store for an app and save its icon to the Photos app.

Get the shortcut here.

Save App Store Screenshots

Search the App Store for an app and save screenshots from the product page to the Photos app.

Get the shortcut here.

Save App to Trello

Save an app from the App Store as a card in Trello. The app's icon, title, and other metadata are used to compose a rich card in Trello.

Get the shortcut here.

Calendar

Fantastical Schedule (Multi-Platform)

View Fantastical's schedule for today using native app shortcuts for the iPhone and iPad versions of the app. The shortcut doesn't require any user interaction to choose platforms.

Get the shortcut here.

Time Until Important Event Location

Calculate how much time you have until an important event comes up. If you specify a location to filter important events, driving time to the selected address is also calculated by the shortcut.

Get the shortcut here.

Upcoming Events

View your next five calendar events in a list. The selected event will be opened in the system Calendar app. This shortcut can be used from the widget.

Get the shortcut here.

Files

Pick File

Pick a file from iCloud Drive and share it with other apps through extensions.

Get the shortcut here.

File Downloader

Download a file from a URL stored in the system clipboard. The downloaded file can be saved in iCloud Drive or other storage providers with a native Files interface.

Get the shortcut here.

Make PDF

Create a PDF from an item shared with the Shortcuts extension via the share sheet. The PDF is previewed with Quick Look, from where it can be saved into other locations using the share sheet.

Get the shortcut here.

Zip and Share

Compress the input items into a .zip archive and share the archive file with app extensions. You can enter the name of the archive manually.

Get the shortcut here.

Shortcuts Backup

Create a .zip archive containing a backup of all your shortcuts. The backup file is saved under the /Backups/ folder of Shortcuts' iCloud Drive directory.

Get the shortcut here.

Attach to Bear Note

Append a file or image to the bottom of a note in Bear. The shortcut will either present the native Files or Photos picker before launching the Bear app.

Get the shortcut here.

Rename and Save File

Rename the file passed as input to the shortcut and save it somewhere else with app extensions. Designed to compensate for the lack of file renaming in the 'Save to Files' extensions in iOS 12.

Get the shortcut here.

Compress Dropbox Files

Pick multiple files from Dropbox and share them as a single .zip archive.

Get the shortcut here.

Copy iCloud Drive Link

Pick a file from iCloud Drive (or other document providers) and create a shareable iCloud Mail Drop URL to let other people download the file.

Get the shortcut here.

Extract Individual Files from Zip Archive

Given a compressed archive passed as input via the share sheet, this shortcut can extract the archive and save individual files contained inside it to iOS document providers.

Get the shortcut here.

Extract All Files from Archive

Extract all files from a compressed archive passed as input and save them into the same folder in iCloud Drive/Shortcuts. The name of the archive is used to create a new destination folder in Shortcuts' iCloud Drive container.

Get the shortcut here.

Add Attachment to Agenda

Append attachments to existing notes in the Agenda app. The shortcuts supports both images and documents from Files, and it can be executed from the share sheet (for input files) or the Shortcuts app.

Get the shortcut here.

Health

Asleep Time

Read the HealthKit database to find out how much you slept last night.
You can modify the shortcut to customize Siri's response based on how much time you slept.

Get the shortcut here.

Log Weight

Log your current weight in HealthKit by entering a numeric value. The shortcut can also be used from the widget.

Get the shortcut here.

Log Waist

Log your current waist circumference in HealthKit by entering a numeric value. The shortcut can also be used from the widget. By default, the shortcut converts centimeters to millimeters.

Get the shortcut here.

Glass of Water

Log a small glass of water in HealthKit. By default, the shortcut logs 150 milliliters of water to the Health app.

Get the shortcut here.

Log Espresso

Log a cup of espresso as caffeine intake in HealthKit. By default, the shortcut logs 50 milligrams of caffeine to the Health app. The shortcut can also be used from the widget and Siri.

Get the shortcut here.

Last Coffee

Check how long ago you had your last coffee based on when caffeine was last logged in HealthKit. You can use this shortcut in the widget and Siri.

Get the shortcut here.

Water Today

Check how much water you've drunk today based on water entries logged in HealthKit. You can use this shortcut in the widget and Siri.

Get the shortcut here.

Average Heart Rate

Calculate your average heart rate for the past two weeks.

Get the shortcut here.

Photos

Share Dropbox Photo

Select an image from the photo library and upload it to Dropbox. The shortcut returns a public Dropbox link to the image that can be shared with other people.

Get the shortcut here.

On This Day

Search your photo library for old photos taken on this day in previous years. The shortcut can look for photos from multiple years, with multiple photos per day. If more than one photo is found, photos are resized to square and combined in a grid.

Get the shortcut here.

Round Avatar

Create a round avatar based on someone's Twitter profile picture. To run this shortcut, save a profile image from Twitter first.

Get the shortcut here.

Combine Images

Combine multiple images into a single image. The shortcut supports images passed as input via the extension as well as picking images manually from the photo library.

Get the shortcut here.

Share Clipboard Image

Share an image from the system clipboard with app extensions. The shortcut supports both images and photo media contained in the clipboard.

Get the shortcut here.

Live Photo to GIF

Convert a Live Photo to an animated GIF and preview it in Quick Look. The GIF can be saved to the Photos app directly from the preview.

Get the shortcut here.

Image to Ulysses Sheet

Add an image to an existing sheet in Ulysses. Images can be shared via the share sheet or picked manually in the Shortcuts app.

Get the shortcut here.

Apple Frames

Add device frames to screenshots for iPhones (6, 7, 8, X, and XS generations in standard/Plus/Max sizes), iPad Pro (11" and 12.9", 2018 models), Apple Watch S4 (40 and 44mm), MacBook Pro (Retina 13-inch), and iMac (5K). The shortcut supports portrait and landscape orientations, but does not support Display Zoom. If multiple screenshots are passed as input, they will be combined in a single image.

Get the shortcut here.

Apple Frames (iOS-only)

Add device frames to screenshots for iPhones (6, 7, 8, X, and XS generations in standard/Plus/Max sizes), iPad Pro (11" and 12.9", 2018 models), and Apple Watch S4 (40 and 44mm). The shortcut supports portrait and landscape orientations, but does not support Display Zoom. If multiple screenshots are passed as input, they will be combined in a single image.

Get the shortcut here.

Email

Mail Merge

A mail merge shortcut that supports multiple variables for email addresses and a second piece of information for each recipient. Each email address is automatically paired with the corresponding variable in the second group. Supports customizable message and subject templates.

Get the shortcut here.

JavaScript

Video Speed Up

Speed up a native video player in Safari choosing from a list of speed presets.

Get the shortcut here.

PiP Video

Enable Picture in Picture mode for a native video player in Safari. Only works on iPad.

Get the shortcut here.

Full Screen Video

Enable full-screen mode for a native video player in Safari.

Get the shortcut here.

Media

Overcast Controls

Navigate chapters or copy links for the Overcast episode you're currently listening to. Best used as a widget.

Get the shortcut here.

Encode to Audio and Share

Encode the file passed to the shortcut as audio and apply custom metadata to it such as artwork, artist name, and album. The audio file is then shared with extensions.

Get the shortcut here.

Music

Tweet Song

Share the song you're listening to on Twitter. The shortcut shares the song's name, artist, and artwork.

Get the shortcut here.

Find Lyrics

Get the title of the currently playing song and search for its lyrics on Google.

Get the shortcut here.

Share Song with Contact

Add the currently playing song to an Apple Music playlist and tell one of your favorite contacts about the addition by sending them an iMessage.

Get the shortcut here.

Apple Music Wrapped

Create a detailed report for the music you've listened to in the past year. The shortcut can optionally create a Top 25 playlist for your most played songs and generate a PDF report. The shortcut is primarily designed for Apple Music subscribers.

To calculate number of plays, the shortcut looks at songs that have been played in full without skipping and added to your library in any given year.

Get the shortcut here.

Task Management

Link to 2Do

Save a link from the clipboard or shared via the extension to 2Do as a new task. You can pick from multiple lists and optionally define a tag to be automatically applied to the new task. The original link is embedded in the task as a 'Visit URL' action.

Get the shortcut here.

Search Reminders For...

Search your Reminders' note fields for a specific text query. By default, the search query is chosen from a list of pre-assembled options.

Get the shortcut here.

Create Webpage Reminder

Create a reminder for the webpage currently open in Safari or Safari View Controller using the webpage's original title and URL. You can type a due date in natural language. The shortcut needs to be executed from the action extension.

Get the shortcut here.

Text

Append to Clipboard

Get text from the share sheet and append it to the system clipboard as a new line.

Get the shortcut here.

Spreadsheet to Markdown Table

Convert a spreadsheet to a MultiMarkdown table. For the best experience, select a table in Numbers, copy cells, then run the shortcut.

Get the shortcut here.

Publish to WordPress

Publish a Markdown post to WordPress via the Shortcuts action extension. The shortcut can extract the h1 Markdown header from a post and use it as title. Optionally, you can publish both standard and "linked list" post types by adding a custom field supported by your WordPress installation.

Get the shortcut here.

Safari Markdown Selection

Convert a rich text selection from a Safari webpage to Markdown and copy the plain text to the clipboard. The shortcut needs to run as an extension in Safari.

Get the shortcut here.

Copy Blank Characters

Generate a string of invisible characters based on the Braille Pattern Blank Unicode character (U+2800). This is a workaround to create shortcuts with invisible names on the iOS home screen. The shortcut lets you choose how many times you'd like to repeat the blank character to avoid issues with multiple shortcuts having the same name.

Get the shortcut here.

Clip to iCloud Clipboard

Clip any kind of text contained in the system clipboard to a Clipboard.txt file stored in iCloud Drive. This shortcut is designed to allow you to keep a record of previously copied bits of text and easily sync them across devices. The shortcut can be executed from the widget, and it also supports rich text and URLs.

Get the shortcut here.

iCloud Drive Clipboard

Copy items items previously clipped to the Clipboard.txt file in iCloud Drive back to the system clipboard. The shortcut can be executed from the widget.

Get the shortcut here.

Create Hyperlink

Create a rich text hyperlink based on a URL from the system clipboard. This shortcut is ideal for creating underlined links for apps that do not support rich link creation such as Notes or Apple Mail.

Get the shortcut here.

Time Tracking

Start Toggl Timer

Start a new timer in your Toggl account. The timer can be assigned a specific description, task, and tag using variables.

Get the shortcut here.

Prepare Toggl Template

This shortcut extracts a project ID and task ID from a project in your Toggl account. These IDs are needed to configure shortcuts that start timers. To access your Toggl account over the API, enter your email:password combination below. The shortcut communicates directly with the Toggl API.

Get the shortcut here.

Timer Running

This shortcut returns details for any currently running timer in your Toggl account.

Get the shortcut here.

Stop Timers

This shortcut stops any currently running timer in your Toggl account.

Get the shortcut here.

Focused Work Session

Start a 20-minute focused work session by setting a timer, enabling Do Not Disturb, and starting time tracking with the Toggl iOS app.

Get the shortcut here.

Web

Save to Evernote and Share

Save any file shared with the Shortcuts extension to Evernote as a new note. At the end of the shortcut, an Evernote link to the note is copied to the clipboard.

Get the shortcut here.

Get Images from Webpage

Count the number of images contained in the current Safari webpage. This shortcut can run in Safari and Safari View Controller from the share sheet.

Get the shortcut here.

Append Link to Evernote

Append URLs shared with the Shortcuts extension (or stored in the clipboard) to an existing note in Evernote.

Get the shortcut here.

Share Long URL

Expand a short URL into the long, unfurled version. Optionally, you can share a textshot associated with the URL by picking a photo from the library.

Get the shortcut here.

Append Links to Evernote

Append a link to an existing note in Evernote. The link is either passed to the Shortcuts extension or read from the clipboard.

Get the shortcut here.

Linked Post → Drafts 5

Create a template for a linked post to an article in Drafts 5. The text selection from a Safari webpage is used as a Markdown blockquote. The original title, author name, and URL of the webpage are also preserved in the note.

Get the shortcut here.

Apple News

Get the latest Apple news from one of your favorite tech blogs. Headlines can be previewed in Siri or the widget.

Get the shortcut here.

Search Pocket

Search your last 50 unread Pocket items for a particular search query, which you can type directly in the shortcut. The result you pick will be opened in Safari.

Get the shortcut here.

Extract Image Links from Webpage

Given a selection in Safari, the shortcut finds all image links contained in the selected portion of the page and offers to open them as new tabs. Selected image links are also copied to the clipboard.

Get the shortcut here.

Open in Twitter Apps

Open a Twitter link in Tweetbot, Twitterrific, or the official Twitter app. Both profile links and individual tweets are supported. The shortcut can be run inside the widget.

Get the shortcut here.

Trigger IFTTT Webhook

Trigger a webhook-based IFTTT applet from Shortcuts. Requires an IFTTT Maker developer key. The shortcut can be executed from Siri or the widget as well.

Get the shortcut here.

Add Clipboard Row to Google Sheet

Send a link from the iOS clipboard to IFTTT, which will add it as a new row in a Google spreadsheet. Requires setup of an IFTTT applet to turn a webhook request into a Google Sheets row.

Get the shortcut here.

Electricity Price

Uses the ComEd Current Hour Average electricity price API for Northern Illinois to return the average price of electricity for the current hour in USD.

Get the shortcut here.

Netatmo Weather Today

Return information from a Netatmo Home Weather Station, which includes indoor and outdoor temperature, humidity, and data from air quality sensors.

Get the shortcut here.

Snooze Slack 1 Hour

Snooze your Slack notifications for 1 hour. The shortcut supports setting a different duration for Slack's do not disturb mode and can also turn off snooze if already enabled. Requires a test API token.

Get the shortcut here.

Linked Post → Ulysses

Create a template for a linked post to an article in Ulysses. The text selection from a Safari webpage is used as a Markdown blockquote. The original title, author name, and URL of the webpage are also preserved in the sheet.

Get the shortcut here.

Other

Clip to Yoink

Save the contents of the system clipboard to Yoink. Can be used from the Shortcuts app, the extension, the widget, or Siri.

Get the shortcut here.

Copy Latest from Yoink

Copy the most recent item saved in the Yoink app. Can be used from the Shortcuts app, the extension, the widget, or Siri.

Get the shortcut here.

Start Workday

Start your workday by turning on a HomeKit switch, setting Hue lights to a focus mode, and waking up your Mac using the 'Remote for Mac' app.

Get the shortcut here.

DND Menu

Enable Do Not Disturb choosing from three different types of expiration times: until manually turned off, until a calendar event is over, or until a specific time.

Get the shortcut here.

Pay for Lunch

Send money to a friend who paid for lunch. The shortcut will add the local business' name in the payment's note field.

Get the shortcut here.

Weather Now

Get the current weather for a specific location provided as a street address. The shortcut can be used in the app, widget, or Siri.

Get the shortcut here.

Today Weather Forecast

Display a weather forecast for your current location and the current day.

Get the shortcut here.

Weather Report

Display a list of forecasts for the next few days, provided by the iOS Weather app. You can pass your street address to quickly return forecasts.

Get the shortcut here.

Hourly Forecasts

Display a list of hourly forecasts for the current location.

Get the shortcut here.

Convert Length

Convert between centimeters and inches with a menu that lets you pick a starting unit. The shortcuts supports interactions (including entering numbers) in the widget as well.

Get the shortcut here.

Convert Temperature

Convert between Celsius and Fahrenheit with a menu that lets you pick a starting unit. The shortcuts supports interactions (including entering numbers) in the widget as well.

Get the shortcut here.

Home Screen Icon Creator

Create a custom icon on your iOS home screen for any app URL scheme, shortcut, contact, or solid color. This shortcut uses the same technique of Apple's Shortcuts app to save an icon to the home screen, but extends it with the ability to fully customize the launcher, including icons and launch images.

Get the shortcut here.